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Aug 24, 2011

Troy Union Church (Troy Union Meeting House 1840) and Troy’s Seven Star Grange (State Grange #73, built in 1876) were among a number of properties in Maine nominated on July 22 by the board of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places.

Nominations are forwarded to the National Park Service in Washington D.C. Within 45 days of receipt, the NPS staff makes the final determination and notifies the state commission, which then notifies the property owners and local elected officials. According to a press release from a Troy town official, nominations are rarely revoked, as the determination made by the State Historic Preservation Commission is recognized as the final determination, and public input is sought prior to state nominations.

The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 established the register to acknowledge “….properties of local and state significance in American history, architecture, archeology, engineering, and culture, and worthy of preservation.”

For the Troy Union Church, the listing recognizes the historic significance of the building’s architecture and construction. It also means members of the church can apply for a restoration grant from the Maine Steeples Project, a partnership between Maine Preservation and Maine Community Foundation.

Norma and Greg Rossel of Troy were among members of the public who attended the meeting. Norma Rossel said she was very pleased with the vote of the Commission, as she has been working on the National Register nomination since November last year. Margaret Henderson, Master of the Troy Seven Star Grange, was not able to attend the Commission meeting, but said later she is hopeful that the national recognition of the grange hall, a place where the community has gathered for all sorts of occasions for 135 years will assist in getting help with maintenance of the big, timber-framed, two-storey hall.

Norma described the National Register nomination as one more step towards the restoration of the historic church building. The steeple has been stabilized, but more funds must be raised to complete the truss repairs before the belfry and roof repairs can be completed, and a grant such as the ones offered through the Maine Steeples Project would help a great deal, she said.

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